Ever been asked FizzBuzz in a programming interview, and thought to yourself, what could I do here that would really throw them off? Well, this. Do this.
raw
private static void FizzBuzz1()
{              
	// Declare all of our variables right here at the top.
	int i, i2;
	string buff;
	Action<string> fb = null;
	goto assignVars;
	loop:
	{
		if (0 == i2 % 3)
		goto dofizz;
		if (0 == i2 % 5)
		goto dobuzz;
		goto donumber;
	}
	endoftheloop:
	if (i --> 0 && (i2 = 100 - i) > 0)
	goto loop;
	goto end;
	dofizz:
	buff += "fizz";
	if (0 == i2 % 5)
	goto dobuzz;
	goto writer;
	dobuzz:
	buff += "buzz";
	goto writer;
	donumber:
	buff += i2;
	writer:
	fb(buff + Environment.NewLine);
	goto justBuff;
	// Do this safely at the end of the function.
	assignVars:
	i = 100;
	fb = Console.Write;
	justBuff:
	buff = string.Empty;
	goto endoftheloop;
	end: ;
}
                            
                        
Nobody can be tooooo mad, since it really is a completely working fizzbuzz. Some may question who taught you that goto works in c#, and why you dont seem to know how to use a for-loop. Some may even question why you assigned Console.Write to an action, or why you didn't just use Console.WriteLine. All good questions. Seems like you would have a lot to talk about during your interview.
Theres nothing like a single method chain which does all of Fizz Buzz. So here's some awesome.
raw
private static void FizzBuzz2()
{
  Console.WriteLine(
    string.Join(
      Environment.NewLine,
      Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
        .Select(
          i =>
            string.Join(
              string.Empty,
              i % 3 == 0 ? "fizz" : null,
              i % 5 == 0 ? "buzz" : null,
              !(i % 5 == 0 || i % 3 == 0) ? $"{i}" : null))));
}